Are Long Hours At Work Killing You? Maybe.

May 13, 2010 at 3:15 pm , by

work stressThe upside to working overtime: time and a half (if you’re lucky) and a few nice words from your boss (also if you’re lucky).

The downside (besides having to stay at work): increased risk for coronary heart disease.

People who work more than 10 hours a day are at a 60 percent greater risk for heart attack, angina and other heart-related conditions, compared with those who log in seven-hour days, according to a  new study in the European Heart Journal. One explanation for this association: type-A personalities—folks who tend to be anxious, competitive and tense—are the ones who are more likely to spend the extra hours behind the desk.

The study looked at over 4,000 men and 1,700 women, with an average follow-up of 11 years. While men were more likely to report working overtime, we’d be willing to speculate that the women felt the stress more acutely. Yes, men are pitching in, but women still tend to have more responsibility in the home. So the next time you’re thinking of spending a late night at the office, ask yourself if you really need to stay or if you can finish the task in the morning—your heart might thank you for it.

Photo courtesy: stuartpilbrow

Categories: Health | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to “Are Long Hours At Work Killing You? Maybe.”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Pamela, Catherine McCormack and Energy in Motion, LHJ Health Editors. LHJ Health Editors said: Are long hours at work killing you? Maybe. http://bit.ly/b1OfoY TGIF! [...]


  2. Long working hours are not only killing us, also family life and personal life too. It’s killing our spirit, which is further causing very serious health problems. Downsizing nowadays is the biggest contributor towards increased workload, which further progresses to longer hours. Americans works longer hours, take less vacations, and retires late than employees in most other industrialized countries, so it figures that many of us are prime candidates for job burnout — the physical and cognitive exhaustion that comes from too much of work stress over a long period of time.Thatswhy it has been recommended to spent some time out of office–away from email and phones—give every employee a chance to connect with one another, sharing some light moments over a good meal, as it tends to spark more creativity when back at the office. Multi-tasking should also be discouraged at all levels. Recognition tools like rewards & all, should also be there to show the staff that bosses appreciate their hard work.