Mad Men

How to Pull Off Kiernan Shipka’s Perfect Sleek Ponytail

February 27, 2014 at 9:11 am , by

While most people consider ponytails to be more weekend appropriate, Kiernan Shipka proves just how fashionable and classic the look can be. The Mad Men star (yes, that’s smart-mouthed Sally Draper all grown-up) pulled her locks into center-parted, high-shine pony, showing off her gorgeous glowing skin. Want to take your ponytail to the next level? Check out this post from Gloss Daily, where we show you how to style the perfect high ponytail with help from a star stylist.

The best way to compliment this hairstyle is to create a natural makeup look, which we break down for you in this step-by-step video tutorial. Simplicity is key in this less-is-more look–after season upon season of long, flowing waves, it’s time to show off that pretty face of yours!

Are you loving Kiernan’s golden blonde hair? Try it on for size with our hairstyle tool!

Also:

The Best Lipsticks for Every Budget

Bold Brow 101

Get Glowing Skin


‘Mad Men’ Inspired Skin Cocktails

March 26, 2012 at 12:01 pm , by

To say that we were anxiously awaiting the return of Mad Men is quite the understatement. We’re happy to have had our fix with last night’s season five premiere, and of course it’s our main topic of conversation today.

Considering the very memorable fête that the new Mrs. Draper threw for Don’s 40th birthday, nothing screams Mad Men more that a good ‘ol drink. These cocktail-inspired beauty concoctions created by Jasmina Aganovic, Founder of Stages of Beauty show us that alcohol can do a lot more than pack pounds onto your waistline. When mixed right it’s actually a beneficial ingredient in skincare recipes that can assist in the fight against fine lines and wrinkles.

Okay so you may not actually be drinking these, but you’ll thank us later!

Spring Fling Mask
Winter takes a toll on our skin so springtime is the time to do some damage control. Exfoliation, detox, and hydration are key. The ingredients in the mask below help us do just that.
·       1 egg white – These have tons of protein and lecithin which help hydrate the skin and cure it from winter’s dry skin woes. Eggs are the symbol of spring and new beginnings in many cultures.
·       1 tbsp Honey – Antibacterial and renewal properties.
·       1 tbsp Brandy – Helps slough off dead skin cells while stimulating circulation for a rosy springtime glow! Plus, the brandy helps fight fine lines and wrinkles.
·       1 tbsp green tea – Detoxifying and antioxidant

The Sidecar Mask
This recipe is based on the Sidecar cocktail (Cognac, Cointreau, lemon juice)
·       1 tbsp Cognac – Cognac is great for stress release (by drinking and applying topically!), plus it helps fight fine lines and wrinkles while healing damage to the skin (wound healing).
·       1 tbsp orange juice – Citrus enzymes for brightening effects
·       1 tbsp lemon juice – Citrus enzymes for brightening effects + antioxidant and astringent properties
·       2 tbsp ground oatmeal – Serves as a cleansing and calming ingredient (reduces redness and irritation)

The “Between the Sheets” Scrub (or Mask)
This recipe is based on the cocktail called “Between the Sheets” (brandy, light rum, triple sec, lemon juice)
·       1 tbsp brandy – Helps slough off dead skin cells while stimulating circulation for a rosy springtime glow! Plus, the brandy helps fight fine lines and wrinkles.
·       2 tbsp packed brown sugar – (this represents rum, which is derived from sugarcane). Despite the debate over the effects of sugary foods on the skin, when applied topically, sugar has some great benefits. Sugar is actually rich in alpha-hydroxy acids, which means that it helps give you glowing skin. When used as a scrub it can help slough off dead skin and stimulate circulation in the body.
·       1 tbsp orange juice – Citrus enzymes for brightening effects (this represents the triple sec)
·       1 tbsp lemon juice – Citrus enzymes for brightening effects + antioxidant and astringent properties


Ladies’ Home Journal Goes to Pot!

March 13, 2012 at 10:43 am , by

Today, the April issue of LHJ hits newsstands, and with it comes reefer madness! In the “Can This Marriage Be Saved?” column, everyone’s favorite since it launched back in 1953, the problem in the marriage is that the wife, a successful working woman, gets high on pot every day. In the margin at the top of the page, we show the results of a poll that we did on attitudes toward medical marijuana: the majority of our readers (60 percent) approve.

We’ve just done a dramatic redesign to make Ladies’ Home Journal much more cutting-edge and fun. But have we gotten, uh, a little too groovy? In short, what were we smoking?

Actually, this is hardly the first time we’ve covered illegal drug use. Way back in 1963, we ran a feature in which Cary Grant talked about the amazing experiences he had on LSD. It was before all the risks were known and it was part of a medical experiment, but still! LHJ? Who’d a thunk it?

The reality is, Ladies’ Home Journal has a long history of covering the reality of women’s lives and current trends, even when it’s controversial. Back in 1906, we endorsed sex education as a way of preventing sexually transmitted disease—an idea that some people still disagree with. Since then we’ve covered everything from housewives struggling with drug addiction (1971) to moms struggling with raising gay teens (2010). Our readers have always been plugged-in, modern women, and we’ve always provided them with content that keeps them informed and up-to-date.

So, yeah, we’ve come a long way since the “Can This Marriage Be Saved?” of ’53 in which one husband’s quote was, “Nancy could learn a lot from some of the secretaries in my office. They know how to be sweet and feminine.” Yikes! Very Mad Men, while the “Can This Marriage Be Saved?” for April 2012 is admittedly closer to Weeds. Still, it’s very much in line with our editorial tradition.

Reactions to our March issue, the first of the current redesign, have been positive: “Looks fabulous and reinvigorated. Love it!” one reader tweeted. “Great job, y’all,” another reader wrote us via email. “Was thrilled to see my old favorites were still in there,” she said. We seemed hipper, yet still the LHJ she loves. The real story is that we were always pretty hip. Your grandma probably did subscribe to Ladies’ Home Journal, but we’ve never been a grandma magazine. We are up-to-the-minute and ahead of the curve—and have been, for a very long time.


Marriage, Mad-Men Style

March 28, 2011 at 3:38 pm , by

The marriages of Mad Men may be dysfunctional, deceitful or just plain doomed, but watching all that drama unfold sure is entertaining. Season 4 of the series comes to DVD and Blu-Ray tomorrow, with all 13 episodes plus special features and commentary.

One of those features is a three-part documentary on divorce in the 1960s, a time when the all-American-family ideal reigned supreme. And no discussion of marriage in the 50′s and 60′s is complete without a nod to Ladies’ Home Journal‘s classic Can This Marriage Be Saved? column, which debuted in January 1953. Check out the clip below from the Mad Men documentary for LHJ‘s shout-out.

Check out our take on Don and Betty’s marriage, when it still existed, through the perspective of one of our therapists. Pick up Season 4 on DVD for the rest of the documentary – and every addicting episode!


Mad Men? Mad Women! Looking Back at The Feminine Mystique

February 25, 2011 at 11:36 am , by

I got together with my friend Stephanie Coontz the other day to talk about her new book, A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s (Basic Books), which has drawn rave reviews from The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and a host of other publications. Stephanie is the country’s foremost expert on marriage—she wrote the 2005 bestseller Marriage, a History: How Love Conquered Marriage—as well as a frequent advisor to Ladies’ Home Journal.

The new book has an unusual premise: It’s a biography not of Betty Friedan, but of Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique, the blockbuster work that forever changed the lives of American women—and men. (Fun fact: LHJ carried an excerpt from The Feminine Mystique in its January 1963 issue, a month before the book’s publication. Surprising? Not really. After all, LHJ has been charting the passions and pastimes of American women for 128 years now. As Stephanie put it, “The story of LHJ is the story of American women.”)

A fascinating examination of Friedan’s much-misunderstood classic, A Strange Stirring should be required reading for any young woman today who believes that she’s “not a feminist.” Not only does Stephanie movingly recount how revelatory The Feminine Mystique was to the millions of discontented housewives who read it, but she also details—with examples that had me shaking my head in stupefaction—the unbridled sexism that characterized life circa 1963. Over coffee, Stephanie recapped a few of the more egregious customs from those “bad old days”:

—Only eight states gave a wife any legal claim to her husband’s earnings or property. In the other 42, a wife’s only right was to be “properly supported.” One Kansas woman married to a successful farmer thought that “proper support” should include running water in her kitchen, since all the farm’s work spaces had it. She sued her husband (not for divorce, but for running water) and he fought her all the way to the Kansas Supreme Court, which agreed with him that “proper support” did not cover this amenity.

—Most states had “head and master” laws that gave husbands the right to make all final household decisions.

—The law did not recognize that a woman could be raped by her husband (South Dakota was the first state to make spousal rape a crime, in 1975) and domestic violence laws, where they existed, were seldom enforced. Read more


Saving Betty Draper’s Marriage

October 15, 2009 at 11:30 am , by

MMS3-Betty-517As the editor of LHJ’s Can This Marriage Be Saved? column, I frequently ponder precisely that question when I watch Betty and Don Draper on Mad Men.

Betty sure seems miserable: She’s got a husband who cheats on her; a daughter who’s a brat; and a baby she doesn’t want. “I hate this place,” she told Don earlier this season. “I hate our friends. I hate this town.”

Somehow, though, I feel pretty confident that Betty is going to tough it out. She threw Don for a while, but took him back when she discovered she was pregnant. (Had a quick little fling in the interim, but, hey, can you blame her?)  And her recent trip to Italy made it clear that she was putting some effort into saving her marriage.

I don’t think this would be the case if Betty were living in today’s world, where practically one in every two marriages end in divorce.  She’s stuck in the pre-feminist ‘60s when divorce carried enormous stigma—and women let men get away with acting like jerks, especially a man who’s as hot and successful as Don.

But can that marriage be saved? And I don’t only mean can it stay intact. I wonder if anything could happen to make Betty less miserable and Don a little more sensitive and caring?  I kind of doubt it.  What do you think?


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